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20120930
20121008
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made a decision to actually reverse a decision he made before on that state's voter i.d. law. it was one of the strictest laws in the country and everyone wanted to know if it was going to go into effect before this election. republican supporters say this kind of law would stop voter fraud. democrats said not really that it would really just keep a lot of voters from being able to vote. real, legitimate citizens who maybe just don't happen to have an i.d., driver's license, or passport. joining me now is cnn crime and justice correspondent joe johns. so, joe, let's break this down. since this is breaking news and you know how it can go with legal decisions, they can be looked at a whole lot of different ways. this particular case, this judge had to look at not the constitutionality of voter i.d.s, he had to look at specifically whether the people of pennsylvania all had equal access to get i.d.s and get to the polls in time. and he's reversed himself from his earlier decision. where does this leave us? >> well, big picture. okay, ashleigh, it's a victory for opponents of the
be a violation of the law. >> joined by our pentagon correspondent, barbara starr. you've been digging into this for new information. you say as early as april, the united states sent special forces into benghazi for a specific reason. >> they did, indeed, carol. what we've learned is that a very small team of special forces commandos were sent to that benghazi compound. this was back in april. if you think back a u.n. -- united nations convoy in the region had been attacked. growing security concerns at that time back in april, about what was going on in that region in eastern libya. so, the u.s. sent a team of about four special forces, commandos to the benghazi compound. they did a security assessment. what could be done to improve security at the facility. and they recommended apparently, we are told, a couple of things that seem fairly minor in retrospect. sand bagging some positions so libyan forces who were there, contractors, essentially, could help fight back if the place came under attack and also were training for some of that private security force that was hired for the co
see. here with it is cnn's kyon law. >>> dinner time means family time at the skillman household, from who is chopping to who's stirring. to who's sitting around the table and who soon won't. how hard is this for your family? >> not real sure. i don't think it's hit them yet. i really don't. >> reporter: a grandfather to three girls, his other title is master sergeant dan skillman, u.s. army reserves. he deploys to afghanistan in weeks, with his wife, master sergeant lola skillman and their oldest son, james, a sergeant. husband, wife, and son will be gone nine months as reserve support at kandahar. despite the 29 years that lola served, this will be her first time deployed to a war zone. are you scared at all? >> yes. some people say no, they're not scared, they're ready to go do this. but i think in the back of everybody's mind it is a little bit terrifying. >> reporter: at the skillman home where the unpaved road meets a montana big sky, they know about sacrifice for country. lola's father was awarded the purple heart during world war ii. dan's father joined the national guard. dan
solid government institutions and a judicial branch that treats all venezuelans equally under the law. he was elected to run against chavez after the venezuelan opposition forged an alliance in january. the 40-year-old candidate says he has visited more than 300 venezuelan towns during his campaign. he stepped on to the national scene during a 2002 riot at the cuban embassy in caracas. the chavez government accused him of insighting the riot and sentenced him to jail for four mis. the courts ended up acquitting him. >> you got this young 40-year-old, you know, he's healthy and strong, fit guy and hugo chavez who has been in power for a while. how do they weigh these two? is it a generational thing? how do they split this? >> it's a generational thing. chavez has been suffering from cancer. also just to give you and idea how uneven the playing field is in venezuela, just for the sake of a hypothetical scenario, imagine president obama has a national tv network paid for with public funds that he can use whenever he pleases to campaign. that's exactly what chavez has in venezuela. he has
's not just that some of them are throwing punches. but it's that encouraging. there's something in the law called party to a crime. basically it means in for a penny, in for a pound. so even if -- we saw a defense attorney saying on there, but my client didn't throw any punches. but if your client stood there and encouraged and aided and abetted and cheered them on, they are just as responsible, under the law. and they can also be charge with the crime of aggravated assault and get up to 20 years if that's what the judge thinks is appropriate. >> how about a defense attorney saying, okay, my client is one of these girls, she's 16 years old, no priors, still she's facing that much time, it's that severe? >> it is because aggravated assault has a range, like every crime. it's not what we call a mandatory minimum. it's a one to 20 range. looking at as low as one year of probation or 20 years of prison. it's all within the discretion of the judge. and it will depend on those different factors. can a defense attorney say, but my client has no priors, never been in trouble before and she is the
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)

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